The arabian horse

Introduction

The Arabian with a known history going back about five thousand years, is the oldest breed of horse in existence. The earliest records depict his ancestors as war horses in the green crescent of Mesopotamia – swift spirited steeds hitched to chariots or bestrode by marauding warriors.

Along with the conquering armies, his forebears and his fame spread throughout the known world. As the prized possession of the great kings and rulers, the Arabian horse became a symbol of power and wealth and he was universally acclaimed as the saddle horse “par excellence.” He was the original source of quality and speed, and he remains pre-eminent in the sphere of soundness and endurance.

Either directly or indirectly, the Arabian contributed to the formation of virtually all the modern breeds of light horse.

 

General Appearance And Impression

A unique combination of beauty and utility, the typical Arabian is a symmetrical saddle horse combining strength and elegance – with a bright, alert outlook and great pride of bearing. The sharply defined facial features, the thin skin with its silken, iridescent coat, the fine hair of the mane and tail and the hard clean legs with their exceptionally clean cut tendons and joints, are characteristic Arabian features associated with a quality of the highest degree.

The movements give an impression of lightness, agility and grace, associated with a free, ground covering stride and great impulsion. There is no standard height, however the usual range is from 14-1 hands to 15-1 hands.

 

 

Attributes

Hearing and sight are acute. Highly intelligent with a unique temperament combining spirit and courage with tractability and exceptional affinity for humans, the Arabian likes to please, but resents abuse.

The Arabian, with its outstanding soundness of wind, limb and constitution is renowned for an endurance capacity far above the average and likewise for its prepotency, fertility and longevity.

 

 

 

 

The Stallion

Stallions should exhibit great masculinity with powerful muscle development, commanding presence, and great pride of carriage. The neck should be high set and arched with a well developed crest. The stallion’s head has shorter ears and stronger musculature of the forehead and jowls. The feet are usually smaller than in the mare. The

scrotum must carry two well developed testicles.

 

 

 

 

The Mare

Mares should be feminine. They are not as strongly made as the stallion with a softer expression and greater refinement. The neck is lighter and often less arched but should have a similar curved attachment to the head. The carriage, light footed and proud, is usually less flamboyant than that of the stallion.

 

 

 

  

 

 

The Stallion

Stallions should exhibit great masculinity with powerful muscle development, commanding presence, and great pride of carriage. The neck should be high set and arched with a well developed crest. The stallion’s head has shorter ears and stronger musculature of the forehead and jowls. The feet are usually smaller than in the mare. The scrotum must carry two well developed testicles.